banner
Home » Knowledge » Content
Product Categories

NEW LITHIUM-RICH BATTERY COULD LAST MUCH LONGER

- May 14, 2018 -

The new battery uses iron, an inexpensive metal that has notoriously failed in batteries. And in another difficult feat, the battery leverages oxygen to help drive the chemical reaction, which researchers previously believed would cause the battery to become unstable. Not only does the battery work, it does so incredibly well.


A rechargeable lithium-iron-oxide battery that can cycle more lithium ions than its common lithium-cobalt-oxide counterpart, the result is a much higher capacity battery that could enable smart phones and battery-powered automobiles to last much longer.


Lithium-ion batteries work by shuttling lithium ions back and forth between the anode and the cathode. When the battery is charged, the ions move back to the anode, where they are stored. The cathode is made from a compound that comprises lithium ions, a transition metal, and oxygen. The transition metal, which is typically cobalt, effectively stores and releases electrical energy when lithium ions move from the anode to the cathode and back. The capacity of the cathode is then limited by the number of electrons in the transition metal that can participate in the reaction.


"In the conventional case, the transition metal is doing the reaction" because there is only one lithium ion per one cobalt, that limits of how much charge can be stored. What's worse is that current batteries in your cell phone or laptop typically only use half of the lithium in the cathode."


The lithium-cobalt-oxide battery has been on the market for 20 years, but researchers have long searched for a less expensive, higher capacity replacement.  Scientists have improved upon the common lithium-cobalt-oxide battery by leveraging two strategies: replacing cobalt with iron, and forcing oxygen to participate in the reaction process.


If the oxygen could also store and release electrical energy, the battery would have the higher capacity to store and use more lithium. Although other research groups have attempted this strategy in the past, few have made it work.


"The problem previously was that often, if you tried to get oxygen to participate in the reaction, the compound would become unstable, oxygen would be released from the battery, making the reaction irreversible."


First, they replaced cobalt with iron, which is advantageous because it's among the cheapest elements on the periodic table. Second, by using computation, they discovered the right balance of lithium, iron, and oxygen ions to allow the oxygen and iron to simultaneously drive a reversible reaction without allowing oxygen gas to escape.


"Not only does the battery have an interesting chemistry but it has the potential to make a better battery that is also cheap."


And perhaps even more importantly, the fully rechargeable battery starts with four lithium ions, instead of one. The current reaction can reversibly exploit one of these lithium ions, significantly increasing the capacity beyond today's batteries. But the potential to cycle all four back and forth by using both iron and oxygen to drive the reaction is tantalizing.


"That means that your phone could last eight times longer which will change the battery industry."